3 signs you can eat raw sugar

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If you are in doubt, these three signs should help.

1st sign

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You just made coffee. This is a sign that you can have raw sugar in the coffee.

2nd sign

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You do not have diabetes. To keep it that way do not to eat too much sugar, stick to a healthy diet and lifestyle.

3rd sign

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You live in New York City and it is 1915. Go ahead, eat as much raw sugar as you like. I am impressed that you are reading this.

 

Photo Credits

The sugar packets and the two moka pots, also known as macchinettas: My iPhone 6 (Thomas Timlen) all rights reserved. The sugar packet photo was edited using Gimp.

Insulin thing by John Campbell and NYC from the OSU Special Collections & Archives – both in the Flickr Commons – no known copyright restrictions.

LETTERS: Lookalikes

LOOKALIKES

MAYFRY

Dear Sir,

Has anyone noticed the similarity between English comedian, actor, writer, presenter and activist Stephen Fry and future British Prime Minister Theresa May? I was struck by the similarities between the two. Do you think they might be related?

Yours faithfully,
Tony Blair

Singapore geocache disaster!

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The box that 3 million geocahers might never find (Photo credits below)

SINGAPORE: Tragedy struck the international geocaching community when one of its most sought after Singaporean containers was whisked away to a Chinese railcar factory in the middle of the night.

Geo WTF?

‘What is geocaching?’ you ask? It’s ok, I had no idea until a Dutch couple shared their passion for this GPS treasure hunting hobby with me. The official website explains it as “an outdoor adventure where players use our free mobile app or a GPS device to find cleverly hidden containers around the world.”

OK, so what’s the ‘disaster’?

Good question. That’s the whole point of this story.

What’s gone wrong is that some geocacher decided to cleverly hide a geocache container under a seat on one of the 26 Singapore MRT Trains that have been sent back to China for repairs.

Millions of Geocahcers have recently arrived in Singapore seeking to locate the hidden container. Not knowing that it is on board a train that is now on the Qingdao Sifang Locomotive and Rolling Stock Company (CSR Sifang) factory premises, they are wandering aimlessly back and forth on Singapore’s North South East West Line.

Not only can such activity cause delays with the few non-defective trains that still operate on these tracks, it also means that these tourists are not spending money at Singapore’s Integrated resorts, shopping malls, theme parks or zoos.

“They might as well have taken holiday on a foreign entity” said one anonymous agency spokesperson.

Good news?

Ok, there is some good news. A few of the geocachers read an article in a Hong Kong newspaper that identified the location of the train containing the sought after geocache container. These geocachers obtained funds from an ang moh bank robber and have made their way to Qingdao, where they can also enjoy the largest bathing beach in Asia.

Such disasters will not happen in the future as all trains will be phased out of the city-state.

 

Photo Credits

Graphic created with photos by alantankenghoe under this license and Trevor Manternach under this license. Thanks guys!

 

Measures in place to prevent ang moh crime

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SINGAPORE: The Ministry of Ang Moh Affairs (MAMA) has measures in place to safeguard against a repeat of the Holland Village bank robbery, said the ministry’s Second Deputy Senior Minister of Theft Bruce Lee on Wednesday (July 6).

Responding to questions from a Member of Parliament, Mr Lee said that MAMA “continually reviews its management of hotspots with hoodie-wearing ang mohs such as Holland Village and Smith’s Authentic British Fish and Chips”.

One ang moh from Australia robbed a bank by handing the teller a note on a piece of paper. He is only the second ang moh in the history of independent Singapore to be seen wearing a hoodie.

Following the incident, authorities stepped up police patrols in the area and curbed consumption of Earl Grey breakfast tea on Orchard Road and in the Marina Bay Financial district.

But, relating a recent visit to Holland Village, Ms Thatcher, who is the President of the Women’s Philately League, said: “It was obvious that the pre-robbery ang mohs have returned to Holland Village. Congregations of such high density are walking time-bombs and crime incidents waiting to happen.”

“It is important that we do not take our eyes off this matter lest we want history to repeat itself.”

The MP for Holland Village constituency put forth some suggestions, including forming a multi-agency Task Force to manage ang mohs; removing all banks to reduce the risk of further bank robberies; building more fish and chip restaurants outside Holland Village; and deporting ang mohs regularly in the middle of the night on Chinese-built trains.

He added that, “Anton Casey left of his own accord, an excellent role model that other ang mohs can choose wisely to follow.”

Many feel that the ang mohs need a stern warning.

 

 

Singapore ‘definitely has not given up’ on trains

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SINGAPORE: Singapore “definitely has not given up” on the use of trains for mass transport, said Mr Choo Choo Loon, director of Public Transport Solutions at the Transport Development Authority of Singapore (TDA), on Thursday (July 7).

In fact, the Government is “taking a leap forward” to eliminate all possible train-related problems afflicting commuters today – the trains, explained Mr Choo in an interview with Fine Gardening Magazine.

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Facebook Police: Bot or not?

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The recent policing of posts in Facebook, resulting with some being removed whilst the users were temporarily suspended from using Facebook has raised a few questions.

People rightly wonder how policing of Facebook is conducted. Is it done by an algorithm or does it require human intervention? If human intervention is required, is this being done by Facebook employees or does Facebook rely on its customers to report posts that violate the Facebook Community Standards (hereafter referred to as ‘FCS’).

My gut feeling is that posts which violate the FCS will remain on Facebook untouched until a user reports them for review. With over one billion Facebook accounts in the system, in many different languages, there are surely plenty that in one way or the other violate the FCS.

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